Constitution Daily

Smart conversation from the National Constitution Center

Civil Rights

Pearl Harbor’s role in a historic Supreme Court decision

December 7, 2017 By NCC Staff

One of the most controversial decisions in Supreme Court history was caused by aftershocks of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and it’s still being debated today.

On this day, Rosa Parks wouldn’t give up her bus seat

December 1, 2017 By NCC Staff

Today marks the 62nd anniversary of Rosa Parks’ decision to sit down for her rights on a Montgomery, Alabama, bus, putting the effort to end segregation on a fast track.

On this day, the Amistad captives return home

November 25, 2017 By NCC Staff

On November 25, 1841, 35 former slaves returned home to West Africa, after a Supreme Court decision, won by former United States President John Quincy Adams, secured their freedom.

Judge issues new ruling against military transgender ban

November 22, 2017 By Lyle Denniston

Criticizing President Trump for making a major policy shift by a tweet, a federal trial judge in Maryland became the second one in recent weeks to block the government’s planned ban on transgender people from the nation’s military services.

10 fascinating facts about Robert F. Kennedy

November 20, 2017 By NCC Staff

On this day in 1925, Robert F. Kennedy was born in Brookline, Mass. Kennedy was one of the seminal figures of the 1960s and led a very public life before he was fatally shot on June 5, 1968, at a Los Angeles hotel.

Remembering Frederick Douglass’ escape from slavery

September 3, 2017 By NCC Staff

Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery on September 3, 1838, aided by a disguise and job skills he had learned while forced to work in Baltimore's shipyards.

10 fascinating facts about the “I Have A Dream” speech

August 28, 2017 By NCC Staff

It was 54 years ago today that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., gave his famous “I Have A Dream” speech as part of the March on Washington. So how much do you know about the speech, and the events that led up to it?

On this day, the Seneca Falls Convention begins

July 19, 2017 By Symone Mazzotta

On July 19, 1848, the first women's rights convention in the United States began at Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, New York.

Video: Remembering Birmingham

June 16, 2017 By NCC Staff

Survivor Sarah Collins Rudolph, Washington Post editor Steven Levingston, and Philadelphia Orchestra composer-in-residence Hannibal Lokumbe discuss how the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church impacted the meaning of “equality” in America and how local events can bring about constitutional change.

On this day: Supreme Court rejects anti-interracial marriage laws

June 12, 2017 By NCC Staff

On June 12, 1967, the Supreme Court issued its Loving v. Virginia decision, which blocked states from passing laws that banned inter-racial marriages. Here is a brief recap of the this landmark civil rights case.

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