Constitution Daily

Smart conversation from the National Constitution Center

Civic Calendar

On this day in 1856: Violence on the U.S. Senate floor

May 22, 2019 By NCC Staff

A nearly fatal beating on the U.S. senate floor on this day in 1856 was another step toward a Civil War five years later. The attacker wasn’t an assassin—it was a fellow congressman.

Plessy’s place in the list of worst Supreme Court decisions

May 18, 2019 By NCC Staff

On May 18, 1896, the Supreme Court’s Plessy v. Ferguson decision upheld the legality of racial segregation in America. Plessy was later overturned, and it holds a controversial place in the Court’s legacy.

The man whose impeachment vote saved Andrew Johnson

May 16, 2019 By NCC Staff

After being impeached, President Andrew Johnson survived his 1868 Senate trial by just one vote. And to this day, how that vote was cast remains shrouded in controversy.

The Mexican-American war in a nutshell

May 13, 2019 By NCC Staff

Mid-May marks two key anniversaries in the conflict between the United States and Mexico in that set in motion the Civil War—and led to California, Texas, and eight other states joining the Union.

The day the Supreme Court killed Hollywood’s studio system

May 4, 2019 By Scott Bomboy

Today marks the anniversary of an important Supreme Court case that helped to end the Hollywood studio system and fuel a young television industry in the late 1940s.

Law Day: 10 famous people who were lawyers

May 1, 2019 By A. H. Nishikawa

May 1 is Law Day, an event that honors “liberty, justice and equality under law which our forefathers bequeathed” to the United States. Learn more about 10 famous people who studied the law, from Abraham Lincoln to Nelson Mandela.

10 birthday facts about President James Monroe

April 28, 2019 By NCC Staff

James Monroe was the only president, aside from George Washington, to run unopposed for re-election. But that may not be the most surprising fact about the last Founding Father to occupy the White House.

Discover 10 treasures from the Library of Congress

April 24, 2019 By NCC Staff

Since its establishment on April 24, 1800, the Library of Congress has grown to become the largest library in the world, with more than 155.3 million items in its holdings. Here’s a look at 10 of the most fascinating pieces.

The day when America moved toward becoming a global power

April 21, 2019 By NCC Staff

On April 21, 1898, Spain broke off diplomatic relations with the United States in a long-simmering dispute over Cuba. The brief war that followed would have permanent implications for American foreign policy and push the formerly isolationist power on to the global stage.

On this day, Benjamin Franklin dies in Philadelphia

April 17, 2019 By NCC Staff

Today marks the 229th anniversary of Benjamin Franklin’s death, which drew many different responses from the citizens of Philadelphia (who mourned in droves) and the U.S. Senate (which refused to mourn Franklin).

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