Constitution Daily

Smart conversation from the National Constitution Center

Andrew Jackson, presidential censure and the Constitution

March 28, 2019 By Abigail Perkiss

On March 28, 1834, the U.S. Senate censured President Andrew Jackson in a tug-of-war that had questionable constitutional roots but important political overtones.

Redcoats in the house? Some myths behind the Third Amendment

March 24, 2019 By Abigail Perkiss

Could British troops evict colonists from their homes, eat their food and use their facilities? That’s not exactly true, even though generations of students have heard that story in relation to the Third Amendment.

A look back at Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s court legacy

July 1, 2018 By Abigail Perkiss

It was 13 years ago today that Sandra Day O’Connor announced her retirement from the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Voting Rights Act at 50: Racial justice, federal protection, and the fight for local control

March 15, 2015 By Abigail Perkiss

On June 25, 2013, the US Supreme Court issued a ruling in Shelby v. Holder, the landmark case that called into question the constitutionality of Section Five of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

The language of protest: Race, rioting, and the memory of Ferguson

December 3, 2014 By Abigail Perkiss

Abigail Perkiss from Kean University examines protests over the Ferguson situation and the use of the word “riot,” which has a long and complicated history in United States history.

Education reform and local control: The fight for Philadelphia’s schools

October 31, 2014 By Abigail Perkiss

Abigail Perkiss from Kean University looks at long, complicated relationship between local and state control over Philadelphia schools, which is heading to the legal system in a contract fight.

The relevance of Brown? Racial justice in the postwar urban north

May 15, 2014 By Abigail Perkiss

Abigail Perkiss from Kean University in Union, New Jersey looks at how the historic Brown v. Board of Education decision led to an end to racial inequity in public schools in the north.

Shelley v. Kraemer: Legal reform for America’s neighborhoods

May 9, 2014 By Abigail Perkiss

Abigail Perkiss from Kean University looks at a landmark 1948 Supreme Court decision that started the end of legally prescribed residential segregation in the United States.

Shelby County v. Holder and the memory of civil rights progress

November 25, 2013 By Abigail Perkiss

Abigail Perkiss from Kean University looks at the practical consequences of the Supreme Court’s Voting Rights decision earlier this year, about a month after the first elections were held since the Shelby County decision was announced.

Abraham Lincoln as constitutional radical: The 13th amendment

July 12, 2013 By Abigail Perkiss

Abigail Perkiss from Kean University looks the importance of the 13th amendment as launching perhaps the greatest legal, economic and social revolution the United States has ever seen

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