First Amendment: Assembly and Petition

Students explore the Founding era legacies of assembly and petition and how those legacies informed the creation of these often-overlooked aspects of the First Amendment. They will complete a close reading activity to compare and contrast ideas presented in the Interactive Constitution and describe the ways these rights have been interpreted by the Court and used by citizens at various points throughout U.S. history. They will evaluate the constitutionality of assembly and petition rights in the modern era through an in-class, civil dialogue addressing questions about time, place, and manner restrictions; counter-protests; protests on college campuses; and other relevant assembly and petition questions.

Essential Questions:

  • Why were the rights to assembly and petition so important to the Founders of the Constitution?
  • What current issues exist relating to these rights?
  • How should we balance the right to collective action with the need for public order?

Get Started:

Classroom Materials

They will complete a close reading activity to compare and contrast ideas presented in the Interactive Constitution and describe the ways these rights have been interpreted by the Court and used by citizens at various points throughout U.S. history.

Lesson Plan

 

 

Explore The Interactive Constitution:

Common Interpretation Matters of Debate


By John Inazu and Burt Neuborne


Beyond Speech and Association
By John Inazu


Reading the First Amendment as a Whole by Burt Neuborne

 

 

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