Honor the Military Heroes of the United States Over Memorial Day Weekend at the National Constitution Center

Philadelphia’s 2017 Stripes and Stars Festival Commemorates Joint Birthdays of the U.S. Flag and Army

A Senate referee could hold the keys to health care changes

Trump lawyers miss key court deadline in immigration case

Judge finds new legal protection for transgender people

Federalism for the Left and the Right

Federalism for the Left and the Right

Breaking down the 25th amendment: What you need to know

States seek to protect health care subsidies

‘Ask Jeff’ about the Constitution

Will the President’s travel ban hold up in court?

Will the President’s travel ban hold up in court?

Podcast: Will the President’s travel ban hold up in court?

Carol Berkin: The Crises of the 1790s and the Birth of American Nationalism

Carol Berkin: The Crises of the 1790s and the Birth of American Nationalism

John Marshall: Patriot, Statesman, Chief Justice Press Kit

Video: Carol Berkin on the 1790s and American Nationalism

What the Founders thought about impeachment and the President

Plessy’s place in the list of worst Supreme Court decisions

On this day, Abraham Lincoln is GOP nominee in an upset

Comey’s Bombshell Memo: What’s Next

John Marshall: Patriot, Statesman, Chief Justice

John Marshall: Patriot, Statesman, Chief Justice explores the influential career of John Marshall during the early years of a new nation. Visitors will learn about Marshall’s experience as a soldier in the American Revolution, his early career as a leading lawyer in Virginia, including his role as a key supporter of the U.S. Constitution during the Virginia ratifying convention. Marshall’s career in national politics is highlighted as well, showcasing his tenure in the House of Representatives and his service as President Adams’s secretary of state. The exhibit also traces Marshall’s constitutional legacy as our nation’s fourth chief justice. This includes landmark decisions such as Marbury v. Madison and McCulloch v. Maryland, his rivalry with President Thomas Jefferson and other Democratic-Republicans, and his efforts to forge bipartisan consensus and unanimity on the early Supreme Court.

The exhibit showcases nearly 30 historic documents and rare artifacts, including Marshall’s traveling desk from the 1797 XYZ Affair (Preservation Virginia), his spectacles (Preservation Virginia), John Adams’s nomination of Marshall as chief justice (National Archives), an 1835 portrait of Marshall by Henry Inman (Philadelphia Bar Association), and an autobiographical letter written by Marshall in 1827 (William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan).

 

Also displayed in John Marshall: Patriot, Statesman, Chief Justice:

 

John Marshall: Patriot, Statesman, Chief Justice is presented in partnership with The John Marshall Foundation.

Lead sponsors for the exhibit are: Bank of America, Cozen O’Connor, Pepper Hamilton LLP, and The Philadelphia Contributionship. Additional sponsors are: Pennsylvania Bar Association and Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s Commission on Judicial Independence. The National Constitution Center and The John Marshall Foundation are grateful for these sponsorships.

WNYC, The Takeaway: Comey’s Bombshell Memo: What’s Next

On this day, the Supreme Court rules against segregation

David Horowitz on President Trump’s Agenda

David Horowitz: President Trump’s Agenda

Membership Coordinator

Video: David Horowitz on President Trump’s agenda

The man whose impeachment vote saved Andrew Johnson

Is there a narrower way to rule on immigration limits?

Final Round of Civic Literacy Contests to Award $175,000 to Three Philadelphia Schools Increasing the Total Number of Contest Winnings to Nearly $600,000

Supreme Court bypasses major test on voting rights

A Twenty-First Century Framework for Digital Privacy

Lawfare: A Twenty-First Century Framework for Digital Privacy

Chris Slobogin

Policing and The Cloud

How Philly lost the nation’s capital to Washington

Frontiero v. Richardson: A landmark case for gender equality

Trump lawyers’ self-created legal dilemma

New Interactive Tool Traces the Evolution of the U.S. Constitution

TIME: New Interactive Tool Traces the Evolution of the U.S. Constitution

Government Technology: Tech Will Require Continued Adjustment and Definition Within the Law, Experts Say

James Comey and the definition of a ‘constitutional crisis’

Secret Searches and Digital Civil Liberties

Looking back: A new Justice replaces a filibustered candidate

Exploring the debate over ‘sanctuary cities’

Extra: Is the firing of James Comey a constitutional crisis?

Exploring the debate over ‘sanctuary cities’

Extra: Is the firing of James Comey a constitutional crisis?

Podcast: Exploring the debate over ‘sanctuary cities’

Video: Digital privacy in the 21st century

Does Comey’s Dismissal Fit the Definition of a Constitutional Crisis?

The Atlantic: Does Comey’s Dismissal Fit the Definition of a Constitutional Crisis?

On this day, the Pullman Strike changes labor law

Digital Divergence

Podcast EXTRA: Is the firing of James Comey a constitutional crisis?

Digital Privacy in the 21st Century

Digital Privacy in the 21st Century

TAP: Neil Richards Tackles Secret Government Searches

The Parallax: How to Strike a Balance Between Security and Privacy (Q&A)

FBI Director job openings usually get filled quickly

Comey’s Feverish Firing, Russia and Cuba’s Energy Dance, Breaking a Prison Pipeline

WNYC, The Takeaway: Comey’s Feverish Firing, Russia and Cuba’s Energy Dance, Breaking a Prison Pipeline

Explore Rare Constitutional Documents Online

As a bonus for our website users, the National Constitution Center’s American Treasures Interactive  (at http://treasures.constitutioncenter.org/) lets you browse four rare draft copies of the Constitution and its first printed final version.

These documents are part of our new exhibit, American Treasures: Documenting the Nation’s Founding, which explores the drafting of the U.S. Constitution in 1787, highlighting the key proposals and significant compromises that influenced the early drafts and shaped the document’s final text.

Exhibit visitors are introduced to the crucial figures who played a role in shaping the Constitution – from James Madison to James Wilson, America’s most important champion of popular sovereignty, or government by “We the People,” and Gouverneur Morris, often credited as the primary writer of the Constitution’s final text.

The exhibit includes some of the most significant constitutional treasures in American history, tracing the origin of the new form of government created by the Framers here in Philadelphia during the summer of 1787.

From the vast collections of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, these treasures include:

You can examine these five documents and learn about important facts and revisions at our Interactive presentation at https://constitutioncenter.org/treasures.

And if you are interested in seeing the exhibit in person, click on the Visit link on that page or go to https://constitutioncenter.org/experience/exhibitions/feature-exhibitions.

American Treasures: Documenting the Nation’s Founding was created in partnership with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

John Marshall: Patriot, Statesman, Chief Justice

Is the Comey firing causing a constitutional crisis?

The Fourth Amendment in the Digital Age

Presidents and trains: Tools of power and symbolism

Christopher Slobogin

Neil Richards

David S. Kris

The Crime Report: Big Brother Online: Policing and the Cloud

Leading Scholars and Thought Leaders Release White Papers on Impact of New Technologies on Privacy, Surveillance, Cybersecurity, and Law Enforcement

Television

Radio

Articles

Videos

By Jeffrey Rosen

Biography

Jeffrey Rosen is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Constitution Center, the only institution in America chartered by Congress “to disseminate information about the United States Constitution on a non-partisan basis. Rosen is also a professor at The George Washington University Law School, and a contributing editor for The Atlantic.

He is a highly regarded journalist whose essays and commentaries have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, on National Public Radio, and in The New Yorker, where he has been a staff writer. The Chicago Tribune named him one of the 10 best magazine journalists in America and a reviewer for the Los Angeles Times called him "the nation's most widely read and influential legal commentator.” He received the 2012 Golden Pen Award from the Legal Writing Institute for his “extraordinary contribution to the cause of better legal writing.”

Rosen is the author of "Louis Brandeis: American Prophet"; :The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America"; "The Most Democratic Branch: How the Courts Serve America"; "The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age"; and "The Unwanted Gaze: The Destruction of Privacy in America." He is co-editor, with Ben Wittes, of "Constitution 3.0: Freedom and Technological Change."

Rosen is a graduate of Harvard College; Oxford University, where he was a Marshall Scholar; and Yale Law School.

Whose Law Governs in a Borderless World?

10 U.S Presidents who also worked as teachers

Which Trump statements count on immigration policy?

Sign Up

Constitution Weekly

Constitution Weekly is a weekly roundup of constitutional news and debate from the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. Subscribers enjoy the best of the Center’s podcast, We the People; the Center’s blog, Constitution Daily; the Center’s Interactive Constitution; and Town Hall programs held at the Center and across the country. In addition, subscribers receive curated resources on the most pressing issues of the week, as well as original analysis from Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen and the Center’s team of constitutional experts.

Click Here For Sample

Just Security: New White Paper Series: 21st Century Framework for Digital Privacy

Floyd Abrams and the Soul of the First Amendment

Floyd Abrams and the Soul of the First Amendment

Video: Floyd Abrams and the Soul of the First Amendment

Lawfare: Digital Divergence: How Digital Network Technology Threatens Both Privacy and Security

Philly.com: Come See Rough Drafts of History and the Constitution

Introducing A Twenty-First Century Framework for Digital Privacy

10 fascinating facts about President Harry S. Truman

Sorting out the new Guantanamo cases

How a C-grade college term paper led to a constitutional amendment

10 WPA posters that are Pinterest-worthy decades years later

Jennifer Daskal

Jennifer Daskal

Philadelphia Business Journal: Constitution Center, Historical Society Announce On-Going Collaboration With New Exhibit

Come See Rough Drafts of History and the Constitution

Newsweek: Can President Donald Trump Fire FBI Director James Comey?

Shop for Materials

Pocket Constitution
Pocket Constitution
The Pocket United States Constitutions are 9-by-22 inches and fold into an approximately 3-by-3 inch square. Receive one FREE Classroom-Ready Resource when purchasing 150 or more Pocket Constitutions.
Constitution Day Kit
Constitution Day Kit
Everything you need for a Constitution Day lesson and activities. Comes with lesson plan, DVD, pocket constitutions and more!