Constitution Daily

Smart conversation from the National Constitution Center

Podcast: Article I and the role of Congress

April 13, 2017 by NCC Staff

 

In the last decade, public approval of Congress hit an all-time low. Indeed, the esteemed body—whose design and power is outlined in Article I of the Constitution—appears to have lost some of its power. Some observers blame the “imperial presidency” and executive overreach; others point to Congress’ own internal dysfunction and obstruction.

What is Congress’ proper constitutional role? What forces have undermined Congress in recent years? And what, if anything, should be done to restore its power?

Joining We the People to discuss are two of America’s leading constitutional experts.

David Pozen is Professor of Law at Columbia Law School.

Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz is Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center.

Show Notes

This show was edited by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Zach Morrison and the Columbia chapters of the American Constitution Society and the Federalist Society for their partnership in producing this event.

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Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

 

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