Constitution Daily

Smart conversation from the National Constitution Center

Supreme Court “Floating House” winner gets second court date

November 20, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

It’s rare for one person to get a victory at the Supreme Court, but a South Florida man will try for a second win this spring in a case about his arrest at a public meeting more than a decade ago.

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Supreme Court takes political clothing at polls case

November 14, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

On Monday, the Supreme Court accepted an appeal about the ability of a voter to wear clothing or campaign buttons at a polling place that endorses a political cause.

How Americans fought to restore Veterans Day to November

November 11, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

This Friday, millions of Americans will take time out to honor our military on the traditional time of 11:11 a.m. on November 11. But there was a time when Congress tried to move the holiday, only to face several years of strong public resistance.

On this day, Supreme Court upholds baseball’s antitrust exemption

November 9, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

On November 9, 1953, the United States Supreme Court upheld a prior, controversial decision that allowed major league baseball to operate outside of the Sherman Antitrust Act.

Senators should serve for life, and other election ideas from the Founders

November 7, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

Today, Americans will vote in elections around the country. But did you know if alternative ideas from the Founders were used today, there would be 6,000 seats up for re-election in the House, and Senators would be serving for life?

The drama behind President Kennedy’s 1960 election win

November 7, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

On November 8, 1960, John F. Kennedy was elected President of the United States in a bitter contest against the incumbent Vice President, Richard Nixon. It was one of the closest elections in American history, and some people still doubt its outcome.

On This Day: Supreme Court says tax-paying Indians can’t vote

November 3, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

On November 3, 1884, the United States Supreme Court issued one of its most controversial decisions, when it said that American Indians who paid taxes didn’t have the right to vote in elections.

Case preview: The wedding cake decision

November 2, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

In early December, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a significant case that “takes the cake” literally, as the issues of religious expression and same-sex civil rights converge in a lawsuit first filed in 2012. 

On This Day: The Stamp Act plants seeds of the Revolution

November 1, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

On November 1, 1765, the hated Stamp Tax authorized by King George III went to effect in the colonies despite months of protests. The act would be quickly repealed, but it started a series of events that led to the American Revolution.

Three ghoulish tales of body snatchers, presidents and the Founders

October 31, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

In a special Halloween feature, Constitution Daily looks at two real-life body snatching stories related to three U.S. Presidents, and a ghoulish tale involving Alexander Hamilton and John Jay.

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