Constitution Daily

Smart conversation from the National Constitution Center

Legal fight set after Trump pulls Obamacare subsidies

October 13, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

President Donald Trump’s decision to stop cost-sharing payments to insurers in the Obamacare marketplace seems headed for a court date in the near future.

Can the Cabinet “remove” a President using the 25th amendment?

October 12, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

In a new Vanity Fair article, the magazine claims former White House adviser Steve Bannon warned President Donald Trump that his own Cabinet could remove him by invoking the 25th amendment. Is that how the amendment actually works?

McConnell ponders giving Senate tradition the “slip”

October 12, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell might allow some Trump judicial nominations to move forward despite objections from home state Senators using a traditional blocking tactic called the blue slip.

Can the media be jailed for criticizing a President?

October 6, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

President Donald Trump wants Congress to investigate news outlets he doesn’t like for what he’s called “fake news” reporting. So if Congress wanted to, could it pass a law that would jail journalists for reporting stories critical of the President or Congress itself?

Party goers v. cops featured at the Supreme Court

October 4, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

Arguments at the Supreme Court on Wednesday featured a case about the liability and immunity of police officers who busted some partiers at a vacant District of Columbia house.

Rutherford B. Hayes: Controversial and little remembered

October 4, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

Today marks the birthday of the one of the most controversial U.S. presidents, Rutherford B. Hayes, who took office amid a constitutional crisis and left office defending his reputation.

Five cases headline the Supreme Court’s next term

September 29, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

The United States Supreme Court starts its new 2017 term on Monday, and significant cases are coming into focus as the Justices consider gerrymandering, religious freedom, voter registration, public unions, and cellphone privacy as issues.

On this day, the Confederation Congress agrees to a new Constitution

September 28, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

On September 28, 1787, the congress under our first constitution, the Articles of Confederation, agreed to submit a new Constitution to the states, an act that would render that legislative body obsolete.

When Supreme Court Justices argued over the American flag

September 27, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

Should Americans be forced to pledge allegiance to the American flag or be allowed to deface the flag as a sign or protest? The flag’s actual rights have been a hotly debated topic among Supreme Court Justices since the World War II era.

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The First Amendment and restricting professional athlete protests

September 25, 2017 By Scott Bomboy

The current debate over pro sports athletes’ symbolic protests in public arenas touches on some basic First Amendment constitutional concepts – and unsettled areas of the law.

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