Constitution Daily

Smart conversation from the National Constitution Center

Can President Trump block people on Twitter?

June 9, 2017 By Nicandro Iannacci

One legal group says that's a violation of the First Amendment.

Recalling the Supreme Court’s historic statement on contraception and privacy

June 7, 2017 By Nicandro Iannacci

It was on this day in 1965 that the Supreme Court ruled in a landmark case about contraception use by married couples that laid the groundwork for a constitutional “right to privacy” in the United States.

The debate over Confederate monuments and how to remember the Civil War

May 25, 2017 By Nicandro Iannacci

The removal of four public symbols of the Confederacy in New Orleans highlights the crucial difference between history and memory.

Is the American free speech consensus under attack?

May 3, 2017 By Nicandro Iannacci

A rapidly changing nation has given new voice and urgency to critiques of strong free speech protections.

Tinker v. Des Moines: Protecting student free speech

February 24, 2017 By Nicandro Iannacci

On February 24, 1969, the Supreme Court ruled that students at school retain their First Amendment right to free speech.

As Obama exits and Trump enters, what does George Washington have to say?

January 10, 2017 By Nicandro Iannacci

Seven lessons from America's first President.

‘Nothing less than a miracle’: The Constitution and the peaceful transition of power

October 21, 2016 By Nicandro Iannacci

Our constitutional system endures because we accept its results.

California teacher tenure survives, but challengers persist

August 29, 2016 By Nicandro Iannacci

A high-profile legal challenge to teacher employment statutes in the state of California ended last week at the state’s highest court when a 4-3 majority declined to review the case.

Does the separation of powers need a rewrite?

August 22, 2016 By Nicandro Iannacci

One prominent legal scholar offers a “friendly amendment” to Justice Robert Jackson’s famous concurrence in Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer.

Hugo Black, unabashed partisan for the Constitution

August 12, 2016 By Nicandro Iannacci

On August 12, 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt nominated then-Senator Hugo Black of Alabama to the Supreme Court.

Sign up for our email newsletter