Constitution Daily

Smart conversation from the National Constitution Center

Eminent domain still under fire

June 23, 2017 By NCC Staff

On June 23, 2005, the Supreme Court ruled in the controversial, landmark case of Kelo v. City of New London.

Supreme Court Scorecard (Updated 6/22/2017): The current term

June 22, 2017 By NCC Staff

The Supreme Court is heading toward the home stretch of an eventful and unusual term. Here is a quick update of the major cases heard in Court since October, with a few other cases left undecided.

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Podcast: Government leaks and the Espionage Act at 100

June 22, 2017 By NCC Staff

Cybersecurity expert Paul Rosenzweig and Stephen Vladeck of the University of Texas explore the constitutional debate over leaks and their publication.

10 fascinating facts about the world’s biggest law firm

June 22, 2017 By NCC Staff

The Department of Justice was created on this day in 1870. Here’s a quick look at what’s commonly called the biggest law firm in the world.

Video: John Avlon and Washington’s Warning to Future Generations

June 21, 2017 By NCC Staff

John Avlon, editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, discusses his new book, Washington’s Farewell: The Founding Father’s Warning to Future Generations. 

When the Supreme Court ruled to allow American flag burning

June 21, 2017 By NCC Staff

On June 21, 1989, a deeply divided United States Supreme Court upheld the rights of protesters to burn the American flag in a landmark First Amendment decision.

The day the Constitution was ratified

June 21, 2017 By NCC Staff

On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the ninth and final state needed to ratify the Constitution.

Video: What Happened to Congress?

June 19, 2017 By NCC Staff

Josh Chafetz, author of Congress’s Constitution, Carl Hulse, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, and David Mayhew, author of The Imprint of Congress, discuss why and what, if anything, Congress can do to take its power back.

On this day, Congress passes the Civil Rights Act

June 19, 2017 By NCC Staff

On June 19, 1964, the Senate ended a long debate, overcoming a record-setting filibuster to join the House in approving the Civil Rights Act. The landmark law was a turning point in American history, as it addressed discrimination and segregation on a national level.

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Looking at America’s forgotten War of 1812

June 18, 2017 By NCC Staff

On June 18, 1812, President James Madison signed a resolution, approved in Congress, declaring war against Great Britain. Over the next two and half years, both sides engaged in bitter contests, and the war ended with much unchanged between the two nations.

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