National Constitution CenterCenturies of Citizenship: A Constitutional Timeline Exhibit
  National Constitution Center Home  
   
  Constitutional
Timeline Home
 
 


Era Overviews

 
  1765-1786  
  1787-1790  
  1791-1824  
  1825-1849  
  1850-1865  
  1866-1885  
  1886-1906  
  1907-1930  
  1931-1946  
  1947-1954  
  1955-1969 >  
  1970-1987  
  1987-  
   
  Help  
   
  Credits  
   
   
     




< Previous Event | Back to Timeline | Next Event >

You are viewing the low-bandwidth version of the Constitutional Timeline. View the broadband version.

1955-1969: We demand liberty and justice for all

August 6, 1965
A new law puts federal muscle behind black voting rights

President Lyndon Johns and Martin Luther King, Jr.

&#8220We must have our freedom now. We must have the right to vote. We must have equal protection of the law.&#8221
–Martin Luther King, Jr.

Fewer than 20% of Alabama’s eligible black citizens are registered to vote. In Mississippi, just 6%.

The Voting Rights Act—signed today by President Johnson—should raise those numbers. It lets federal workers oversee registration of voters wherever there has been discrimination.

As with 1964’s Civil Rights Act, peaceful protests led by activists like Martin Luther King, Jr., deserve much of the credit.

Hopes are that the new law, backed by the authority of the Constitution, will end a century of voting discrimination.

Read about it in the New York times

< Previous Event | Back to Timeline | Next Event >


You are viewing the low-bandwidth version. View the broadband version (Flash plug-in and broadband connection required)

 

Home | Feedback | Site Map
525 Arch Street, Independence Mall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106 ph.215.409.6600
Content Copyright 2006, National Constitution Center. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy