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1787-1790: We adopt a Constitution for our new Republic

September 19, 1787
We go to sleep with Articles and wake up with a Constitution

Reprint of the Constitution

“It appears to me…little short of a miracle, that the Delegates from so many different States…in their manners, circumstances, and prejudices, should unite in forming a system of national Government.”
—George Washington

What a shock! Today’s Pennsylvania Packet finally reveals what General Washington, Dr. Franklin and other leaders meeting in the State House have been up to all summer.

We thought they were busy rewriting the Articles of Confederation. Instead, we discover, they’ve thrown them out altogether and have written a “Constitution.”

This Constitution creates a strong new national government. But it also limits the government’s powers, dividing them between the states and the nation...and among the government’s three branches.

The Constitution limits the government’s powers, but not ours. Its fate is now in our hands. We must choose men to speak for us at state conventions. The Constitution cannot become law unless it’s ratified by 9 of the 13 states.

Should we approve it?

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