Resources

Lesson Plans

Download a lesson plan to accompany Lincoln's Crossroads

Intro: General sites about Lincoln and the Civil War era

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module10/

The Gilder Lehrman website provides teaching modules and lesson plans for significant events related to the Civil War.

http://www.eagleton.rutgers.edu/e-gov/e-politicalarchiveCivilWar1.htm

The Rutgers University Eagleton Institute of Politics provides a “Digital Archive of American Politics” that includes a Civil War timeline.

http://www.pinzler.com/ushistory/timeline6.html

The Fieldston School’s “United States History Survey” website provides a brief Civil War and Reconstruction timeline.

http://www.hti.umich.edu/l/lincoln/

The Abraham Lincoln Association provides access to the Roy P. Basler edition of “The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln” in a searchable database with links to classroom material, a bibliography, and “The Lincoln Log,” a daily chronology of the life of Abraham Lincoln.

http://www.mrlincolnandfriends.org/content_inside.asp?pageID=15&subjectID=1

The Lincoln Institute’s “Mr. Lincoln and Friends” website provides a useful summary of Lincoln’s unsuccessful 1855 Senate campaign.

http://showcase.netins.net/web/creative/lincoln/speeches/cooper.htm

The “Abraham Lincoln Online” website provides a transcript of Lincoln’s 1860 Cooper Union Address with a brief introduction.

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/1861/april/call-for-volunteers.htm

“The Civil War” website provides more than 3,000 pages of original Civil War content, including reports on Lincoln’s call for volunteers in the April 27, 1861 issue of Harper’s Weekly.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/almtime.html

The Library of Congress’s “Abraham Lincoln Papers” website provides access to approximately 20,000 original documents with transcriptions searchable by key words. This site also includes a useful Emancipation Proclamation timeline.

http://valley.vcdh.virginia.edu/

The Virginia Center for Digital History's “Valley Project” provides details on life in two American communities, one Northern and one Southern, from the time of John Brown's Raid through the Era of Reconstruction. This digital archive contains thousands of original letters and diaries, newspapers and speeches, census and church records, by both men and women in Augusta County, Virginia, and Franklin County, Pennsylvania. The section on the Civil War years includes battle maps and soldiers' records as well as images, official records, letters, diaries, and newspapers.

Chapter 1 Run Again for Public Office

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=28&page=transcript

The National Archives’ “Our Documents” website provides a transcript of the Kansas-Nebraska Act.

http://www.mrlincolnandfriends.org/content_inside.asp?pageID=15&subjectID=1

The Lincoln Institute’s “Mr. Lincoln and Friends” website provides a useful summary of Lincoln’s unsuccessful 1855 Senate campaign.

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=336

The “Digital History” website provides a short description of the Lincoln-Douglas debates.

http://showcase.netins.net/web/creative/lincoln/speeches/cooper.htm

The “Abraham Lincoln Online” website provides a transcript of Lincoln’s 1860 Cooper Union Address with a brief introduction.

Chapter 2 Appease the South

http://www.slaveryinamerica.org/history/hs_lp_compromise1850.htm

The “Slavery in America” website provides a lesson plan examining the Compromise of 1850.

http://www.ehistory.com/world/articles/ArticleView.cfm?AID=32

The “eHistory” website provides an article by William O. Scheeren on Lincoln’s election to the presidency in 1860.

Oath of Office March 1861

http://www.ku.edu/carrie/docs/texts/19linc1.htm

The “AMDOCS: Documents of American History” website provides a transcript of Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address with a brief introduction.

http://www.cprr.org/Museum/Ephemera/Republican_Platform_1860.html

The “Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum” website provides a broadside of the 1860 Republican National Platform.

http://www.harpers.org/RepublicanNationalConvention.html

The “Harper’s Magazine” website provides a report from the July 1860 issue of Harper’s New Monthly Magazine on the 1860 Republican National Convention, including excerpts from the platform and tallies of the balloting.

http://www.multied.com/elections/1860.html

The “Historycentral.com” website provides information about the 1860 presidential election, including graphic representations of the popular and electoral votes.

Chapter 3 Surrender Fort Sumter

http://www.tulane.edu/~sumter/

Tulane University’s “Crisis at Fort Sumter” website provides an interactive historical simulation and decision-making program in nine sections, including an overview of the Sumter crisis.

http://www.us-civilwar.com/sumter.htm

The “US-Civil War.com” website provides a summary of the Fort Sumter crisis.

http://library.thinkquest.org/3055/graphics/battles/fortsumter.html

The “Battles of the Civil War” website provides a brief summary of the Sumter engagement.

Chapter 4 Wait for Congress

http://www.fff.org/freedom/0695e.asp

The Future of Freedom Foundation’s “Freedom Daily” website provides an essay on “The Power to Declare War – Who Speaks for the Constitution?” by Doug Bandow, senior fellow at the Cato Institute.

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/1861/april/call-for-volunteers.htm

“The Civil War” website provides more than 3,000 pages of original Civil War content, including reports on Lincoln’s call for volunteers in the April 27, 1861 issue of Harper’s Weekly.

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761554908_5/Congress.html

The Encarta Encyclopedia’s entry on the “Congress of the United States” includes a brief summary of congressional action during the Civil War.

http://www.historyplace.com/lincoln/proc-2.htm

“The History Place” website provides a transcript of Lincoln’s Proclamation of Blockade Against Southern Ports.

http://www.civilwarhome.com/blockade.htm

“Shotgun's Home of the American Civil War” website provides a discussion of the blockading of Southern ports from “The Blockade and the Cruisers” by James Russell Soley.

http://www.historywise.com/KoTrain/Courses/AL/AL_Foreign_Affairs.htm

The “historywise.com” website provides a discussion of the blockade’s impact on foreign affairs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_blockade

The “Wikipedia” website provides a discussion of the blockade and its implications.

Chapter 5 Disobey Court Order

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Merryman

The “Wikipedia” website provides a biographical note on John Merryman.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ex_parte_Merryman

The “Wikipedia” website provides a brief discussion of the Ex Parte Merryman court case.

http://supreme.lp.findlaw.com/supreme_court/justices/pastjustices/taney.html

The “FindLaw” website provides biographical information about Chief Justice Roger Taney.

Chapter 6 Endorse Fremont’s Emancipation Proclamation

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USASproclamation.htm

The “Spartacus Educational” website provides a discussion of the Emancipation Proclamation with related links.

http://www.history.rochester.edu/class/douglass/part4.html

The History Department of the University of Rochester provides a biography of the life of Frederick Douglass by Sandra Thomas, including a discussion of his fight for emancipation during the Civil War years.

http://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=23380

The “123helpme.com” website provides a brief discussion of the Emancipation Proclamation and its consequences.

Chapter 7 Propose and Emancipation Proclamation

http://www.history.umd.edu/Freedmen/bordstat.htm

A transcript of Lincoln’s July 12, 1862 appeal to border state congressmen for compensated emancipation is provided on the University of Maryland’s “Freedmen and Southern Society Project” website.

http://www.learner.org/channel/workshops/primarysources/emancipation/docs/appeal.html

“Primary Sources: Workshops in American History” provides a transcript of Lincoln’s July 12, 1862 appeal to Border State congressmen for compensated emancipation, including discussion questions.

http://www.nps.gov/ncro/anti/emancipation.html

The “Antietam National Battlefield” website provides a transcript of the Emancipation Proclamation.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/almtime.html

The Library of Congress’s “Abraham Lincoln Papers” website provides access to approximately 20,000 original documents with transcriptions searchable by key words. This site also includes a useful Emancipation Proclamation timeline.

http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/emancipa.htm

The Yale Law School’s “Avalon Project” website provides a transcript of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Chapter 8 Allow Blacks to Join the Army

http://americancivilwar.com/colored/histofcoloredtroops.html

The “AmericanCivilWar.com” website provides a brief discussion of black troops in the Civil War.

http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/index.html

The National Park Service’s “Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System” provides a history of African Americans in the Civil War and access to regimental histories.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart4.html

The Library of Congress’s “African American Odyssey” website provides an exhibit section on the Civil War that includes discussion of contrabands, the Emancipation Proclamation, and black soldiers.

Chapter 9 Issue a Final Emancipation Proclamation

Use links from Chapter 7

Chapter 10 Support Free Speech

http://www.adena.com/adena/usa/cw/cw187.htm

The “Adena.com” website provides the transcript of a speech by Clement Vallandigham delivered in Dayton, Ohio on August 2, 1862.

http://www.adena.com/adena/usa/cw/cw188.htm

The “Adena.com” website provides the transcript of a speech by Clement Vallandigham delivered to the House of Representatives on July 10, 1861.

Chapter 11 Uphold an Unpopular Draft

http://www.nyhistory.org/teachers/tension.html

The “New York Historical Society” website provides a work sheet on the New York City Draft Riots.

Chapter 12 Support the 13th Amend.

http://13thamendment.harpweek.com/

The “HarpWeek” website provides a complete overview of the 13th Amendment.

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module10/

The Gilder Lehrman website provides teaching modules and lesson plans for the 13th Amendment and other significant events related to the Civil War.

Chapter 13 Negotiate for Peace

http://valley.vcdh.virginia.edu/

The Virginia Center for Digital History's “Valley Project” provides details on life in two American communities, one Northern and one Southern, from the time of John Brown's Raid through the era of Reconstruction. This digital archive contains thousands of original letters and diaries, newspapers and speeches, census and church records, by both men and women in Augusta County, Virginia, and Franklin County, Pennsylvania. The section on the Civil War years includes battle maps and soldiers' records as well as images, official records, letters, diaries, and newspapers.