Main Exhibition

Main Exhibition

Step inside and be inspired by interactive exhibits, live performances, rare artifacts, and hands-on activities that bring the Constitution to life for all ages of people.

The National Constitution Center’s main exhibitions include three attractions: Freedom Rising, a multimedia theatrical production; The Story of We the People, an interactive exhibition; and the iconic Signers’ Hall, with 42 life-size, bronze statues of the Founding Fathers.  Photography and video of any kind are prohibited in the museum exhibit areas, with the exception of Signers’ Hall.

The Main Exhibitions

Freedom rising

Freedom rising

Begin your experience with this stirring 17-minute journey from 1787 to the present. Freedom Rising is a multimedia theatrical production with 360-degree projection, state-of-the-art sound and lighting, and a live actor who narrates the American quest for freedom.

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The Story of We the People

The Story of We the People

This dynamic, interactive exhibition illuminates America’s constitutional history through innovative exhibits, films and photographs, rare artifacts, and hands-on activities led by our education staff.

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Signer's Hall

Signer's Hall

One of the Center’s most popular and iconic attractions, Signers’ Hall invites you to sign the Constitution alongside 42 life-size, bronze statues of the Founding Fathers present at the signing on September 17, 1787.

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Artifact Spotlight

Abraham Lincoln Signiture from Gettysburg, 1863

Abraham Lincoln Signiture from Gettysburg, 1863

This is the only known signature of Abraham Lincoln from the day he delivered his famous Gettysburg Address. It was collected in an autograph book used to gather the signatures of dignitaries attending the dedication ceremony of Gettysburg National Cemetery on November 19, 1863.

On loan from the Lewis Katz Irrevocable Trust dated June 12, 2003 for the benefit of Ethan, Brooke, Taryn and Remi Silver.

Light-sensitive artifacts need to rest periodically and might not be on display at the time of your visit.

“March on Washington” Button, 1963

“March on Washington” Button, 1963

On August 28, 1963, buttons like this were distributed at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, organized to pressure the Kennedy administration into passing civil rights legislation. More than 200,000 demonstrators, gathered at the Lincoln Memorial, heard Martin Luther King Jr., deliver his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Museum of American Political Life, University of Hartford

Light-sensitive artifacts need to rest periodically and might not be on display at the time of your visit.

World Trade Center Wreckage, 2001

World Trade Center Wreckage, 2001

This mangled, steel I-beam is from the World Trade Center. The September 11, 2001, attacks killed thousands and raised, yet again, the issue of balancing national security and civil liberties.

National Constitution Center Collection, Gift of the City of New York

Light-sensitive artifacts need to rest periodically and might not be on display at the time of your visit.
 

Punch Card Voting Machine, 2000

Punch Card Voting Machine, 2000

This voting machine was used in Palm Beach County, Florida, during the 2000 presidential election. The punch card system with its confusing “butterfly ballots” led to a dispute over Florida’s decisive electoral votes.

National Constitution Center Collection

Light-sensitive artifacts need to rest periodically and might not be on display at the time of your visit.

Main Exhibition Must-Sees

Supreme Court Bench

Supreme Court Bench

Try on a justice’s robe, take a seat, and weigh in on famous Supreme Court cases. Plus, check out the actual robe worn by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

Voting Booths

Voting Booths

In our interactive voting booths, you can take part in “fantasy elections” between presidents from Harry Truman to Barack Obama.

American National Tree

American National Tree

Engage with interactive touch screens to learn about 100 citizens who have shaped America’s constitutional history.

Presidential Oath of Office

Presidential Oath of Office

Do you solemnly swear to preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution? Watch yourself on the big screen as you recite the oath of office.

Living News

Living News

Featuring three engaging actors who play multiple roles, this live theatrical performance introduces controversial constitutional issues and encourages students to explore their own points of view.

Where is the U.S. Constitution?

Explore two significant heirlooms of our constitutional heritage: the first public printing and the signed, handwritten Constitution.

First Public Printing of the Constitution

First Public Printing of the Constitution

The National Constitution Center owns a rare, original copy of the first public printing of the Constitution. The Constitutional Convention was conducted under an oath of secrecy, so this printing represents the first time Americans saw the Constitution.

Signed, Handwritten Constitution

Signed, Handwritten Constitution

The signed, handwritten Constitution is at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. It was signed in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787, by 39 delegates to the Constitutional Convention.

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Feature Exhibits

Feature Exhibits

These must-see exhibitions offer fresh perspectives on the Constitution.

Plan Your Visit

Plan Your Visit

Get the scoop on hours, admission, directions, and other handy information.

Calendar

Calendar

The Museum of We the People

See Freedom Rising, Signers’ Hall and more. Step inside and be inspired by interactive exhibits, live performances, rare artifacts, and hands-on activities that bring the Constitution to life for all ages.