Worthwhile Tradeoffs: Surveillance in a Constitutional Democracy Part 1

April 17, 2014 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

$15 with advanced registration, $25 day of the event • Non-CLE: Free with advanced registration, $15 day of the event

Pepper Hamilton LLP, Temple University Beasley School of Law and the National Constitution Center present “Worthwhile Tradeoffs": Surveillance in a Constitutional Democracy A Two-Part Symposium

Surveillance, Whistleblowing, and Digital Civil Disobedience.

This symposium will consist of three panels addressing issues arising out of revelations over the past year of formerly secret surveillance programs being conducted by U.S. government agencies, principally the National Security Agency (NSA). These programs have raised fundamental questions about the place of surveillance in a democratic society. Among the topics to be discussed will be:

• Surveillance, the Constitution, and Reciprocal Trust

• Whistleblowing, Leaks, and State Secrets in a Transparent Society

• Digital Civil Disobedience

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER for April 17 Event • CLE Credit (5 PA Substantive Hours): $15 with advanced registration, $25 day of the event (tickets can be purchased at the Box Office on the main level) • Non-CLE: Free with advanced registration, $15 day of the event (tickets can be purchased at the Box Office on the main level)

Part I: Surveillance, Whistleblowing, and Digital Civil Disobedience
National Constitution Center


Lunch can be purchased at Delegates' Cafe inside the National Constitution Center. Food is prohibited inside the auditorium.


10:00 - 10:15 am: Welcome and Opening Remarks
o    Jeffrey L. Vagle
Pepper Hamilton LLP
Chair, Cyberspace Law Committee, Philadelphia Bar Association

10:15 – 11:00  am: Keynote
o    Jeffrey Rosen
Professor, George Washington Law School
President and CEO of the National Constitution Center

11:00-12:15 pm: Panel 1—Surveillance, the Constitution, and Reciprocal Trust
One of the core principles that gave life to the Constitution is the philosophy that reciprocal trust between government and its citizens is necessary for a healthy democratic society. This panel will explore the effect that pervasive, persistent surveillance programs have on this relationship, and whether our constitutional values can sustain a surveillance state.
Moderator
o    Craig Green
Professor of Law, Temple University Beasley School of Law
 
Panelists
o    Alan Butler
Appellate Advocacy Counsel, Electronic Privacy Information Center
o    Shane Harris
Senior Staff Writer, Foreign Policy; Fellow, New America Foundation
Author of The Watchers: The Rise of America’s Surveillance State
o    Christopher Jon Sprigman
Professor of Law, New York University Law School
 

12:15 - 1:15 pm  Lunch

Lunch can be purchased at Delegates' Cafe inside the National Constitution Center. Food is prohibited inside the auditorium.

 

1:15 – 2:45 pm: Panel 2—Whistleblowing, the Press, and State Secrets in a Transparent Society
Journalists and advocacy groups have expressed concern over a growing lack of transparency in government, with administrations that regularly stifle routine disclosure of information, aggressively pursue and prosecute leakers and whistleblowers, and generally discourage government sources from speaking to journalists. This panel will discuss the history and relevance of government secrecy, and the role—and dangers—of whistleblowing in an open society.
Moderator
o    Jeffrey L. Vagle
Pepper Hamilton LLP
Chair, Cyberspace Law Committee, Philadelphia Bar Association
 
Panelists
o    Siobhan Gorman
Intelligence Correspondent, The Wall Street Journal
o    David Kairys
Professor of Law, Temple University Beasley School of Law
o    John Raines
Professor of Religion, Temple University
Member, Citizens' Commission to Investigate the FBI

2:45 -3:00 pm  Networking Break
 
3:00 - 4:30 pm: Panel 3—Digital Civil Disobedience
Ubiquitous computing and networks have dramatically increased the opportunities for political activism and have tested the definition of political borders. But these same tools and technologies are being used by state intelligence agencies and private companies to conduct surveillance on individuals and groups who are perceived as threats. What does civil disobedience mean online, and what is its future when your every digital move may be watched?
Moderator
o    David Post
Professor of Law, Temple University Beasley School of Law
 
Panelists
o    Matt Blaze
Professor and Director of Distributed Systems Lab, University of Pennsylvania
o    Tor Ekeland
Attorney and Lead Counsel for Defendant in U.S. v. Auernheimer
o    Andy Greenberg
Technology, Privacy, and Information Security Correspondent, Forbes
Author, This Machine Kills Secrets
 
4:45 - 6:00 pm: Cocktail Reception
Light hors d'oeuvres provided.  Cash bar.


To register for April 17  click here or contact Jennifer Kuban at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 412.454.5823 with questions