CEO Articles

Living Under an Authoritarian Regime

Jeffrey Rosen, President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Constitution Center, discusses the history of executive powers in America.

Indivisible WNYC

February 22, 2017

The Trump Challenge is Constitutional

Podcast: Jeffrey Rosen on the legal battle over Trump's immigration order.

Spiked

February 18, 2017

Ex-VP Biden Elected Chair of National Constitution Center

Former Vice President Joe Biden has been elected chair of the board of trustees at Philadelphia's National Constitution Center.

AP

February 15, 2017

Biden to Chair National Constitution Center in Philadelphia

"Vice President Biden has devoted himself to educating all Americans about the founding principles of the Constitution and their timeless relevance today,” Rosen said.

Politico

February 15, 2017

Biden Elected Chair of Nonpartisan National Constitution Center

"I am honored to chair the National Constitution Center and to succeed Governor Jeb Bush, President Bill Clinton, and President George H.W. Bush at the head of this national treasure,” Biden said in a statement.

The Hill

February 15, 2017

Joe Biden Tapped as Chairman of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia

Mr. Biden called the center “a national treasure.”

The Washington Times

February 15, 2017

Biden Named Chair of the National Constitution Center

NCC president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen said that the NCC board of trustees voted unanimously to select Biden, and that his term would begin immediately.

Philly.com

February 14, 2017

SCOTUS Nomination

Jeffery Rosen, President and CEO of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, talks with host Carol Castiel about the politics and substance of President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch.

Encounter, VOA

February 10, 2017

The Anti-Trump Resistance: Lawyers Lead the Fight Against the White House

“Administrative law is suddenly glamorous,” says Jeffrey Rosen, the president of the Constitution Center in Philadelphia.

Newsweek

February 10, 2017

How Trump’s Criticism of Judiciary Could Complicate Supreme Court Confirmation

Jeffery Rosen, the president of the National Constitution Center, said he expects Democratic senators to seek reassurance that Gorsuch will uphold the Constitution, regardless of Trump's wishes.

ABC News Online

February 09, 2017

Not Even Andrew Jackson Went as Far as Trump in Attacking the Courts

The former president was critical of Chief Justice John Marshall’s rulings. But it was on constitutional, rather than political or personal, grounds. An article by Jeffrey Rosen.

The Atlantic

February 09, 2017

Supreme Court Nominee Calls Trump’s Attacks on Judiciary ‘Demoralizing’

Jeffrey Rosen, the president of the National Constitution Center...said there was a rich history of presidents strongly criticizing judges on matters of law.

The New York Times

February 08, 2017

DOJ, States Argue Whether to Lift Suspension of Trump’s Travel Ban

"Essentially, these judges seemed quite willing to delve into the substantive constitutional as well as the statutory arguments."

All Things Considered NPR

February 07, 2017

Legal Challenges to Trump’s Actions Highlight Limits of Presidential Power

NPR'S Robert Siegel interviews Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, about Judge Robart's wording regarding whether the executive order on immigration is rational and grounded in facts.

All Things Considered NPR

February 07, 2017

Judge’s Restraining Order on Trump Travel Ban

Constitutional Scholar Jeffrey Rosen explains the federal judge's restraining order on President Trump's refugee travel ban.

CNN Michael Smerconish

February 04, 2017

First in Playbook

Jeffrey Rosen in The Atlantic, “A Jeffersonian for the Supreme Court”: “[H]is record suggests a willingness to transform the law and to enforce constitutional limitations on the excesses of Congress and the president.…"

Politico

February 02, 2017

If Confirmed, Would Neil Gorsuch Rule Contrary to Trump’s Policies?

Legal expert Jeffrey Rosen says of the Supreme Court nominee: "If he thought that individual liberty was threatened by presidential or congressional overreaching, then he would step in."

Fresh Air NPR

February 01, 2017

Evaluating Trump’s Nomination of Judge Gorsuch to the Supreme Court: A Lesson Plan

In this 2011 Op-Ed, Jeffrey Rosen, a law professor at George Washington University and the legal affairs editor of The New Republic, described originalism.

The New York Times

February 01, 2017

Trump’s SCOTUS pick; then, Trump’s EOs and the Constitution

President Trump named his pick for the vacant Supreme Court seat Tuesday night. Today, we’ll talk with JEFFREY ROSEN, President and CEO of the National Constitution Center, and with MEG KINNARD, reporter for the Associated Press about Trump’s nomination and what it means for the nation’s highest court.

Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane WHYY NPR

February 01, 2017

A Jeffersonian for the Supreme Court

Neil Gorsuch’s record suggests a willingness to transform the law and to enforce constitutional limitations on the excesses of Congress and the president. An article by Jeffrey Rosen.

The Atlantic

February 01, 2017

Conservative Gorsuch Emulates Scalia Minus the Rough Edges

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the bipartisan National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, has known Gorsuch since they worked as clerks on the federal appeals court in Washington, though for different judges.

Associated Press

February 01, 2017

Trump Picks Gorsuch for Supreme Court

“Neil Gorsuch is one of the most respected conservative originalist legal intellectuals of his generation,” said Jeffrey Rosen of the National Constitution Center.

Politico

January 31, 2017

Donald Trump Names Neil Gorsuch His Supreme Court Nominee

"Like Justice Scalia, he sometimes reaches results that favor liberals when he thinks the history or text of the Constitution or the law require it..." Jeffrey Rosen of the National Constitution Center told Politico.

Teen Vogue

January 31, 2017

Trump Announces Supreme Court Nominee Gorsuch

“He is one of the most respected conservative legal intellectuals on the federal bench,” said Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.

Philly.com

January 31, 2017

Who Is Neil Gorsuch? Everything You Need to Know About Trump’s Supreme Court Pick

"The real appeal of Gorsuch nomination is he’s likely to be the most effective conservative nominee in terms of winning over Anthony Kennedy and forging conservative decisions on the court,” Jeffrey Rosen, of the National Constitution Center, told Politico.

Vanity Fair

January 31, 2017

Trump Nominates Neil Gorsuch to Fill Supreme Court Vacancy

Jeffrey Rosen of the National Constitution Center told Politico that Gorsuch is the person “likely to be the most effective conservative nominee in terms of winning over” Kennedy and forging conservative decisions on the court.

Las Vegas Review Journal

January 31, 2017

Neil Gorsuch: Who Is He? Bio, Facts, Background and Political Views

“The real appeal of Gorsuch nomination is he’s likely to be the most effective conservative nominee in terms of winning over Anthony Kennedy and forging conservative decisions on the court,” said Jeffrey Rosen of the National Constitution Center.

Politico

January 31, 2017

Scalia’s Views Mixed with Kennedy’s Style: Meet Neil Gorsuch, Trump’s Pick for the Supreme Court

“Neil Gorsuch is an impressive, wide-ranging legal intellectual and one of most respected originalists of his generation,” said Jeffrey Rosen, president of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. “His opinions show a commitment to the history and text of the Constitution, regardless of where the results lead.”

Los Angeles Times

January 31, 2017

Neil Gorsuch’s Political Views: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Jeffrey Rosen of the National Constitution Center told Politico this week that because of the way Neil Gorsuch approaches his cases, there will likely be instances in which liberals are pleased by the way Gorsuch comes down on an issue.

Heavy

January 30, 2017

Our Constitution and Our “Overinflated Presidency”

Our American Stories talks to Jeffrey Rosen, President and CEO of the National Constitution Center, about the wonders of the U.S. Constitution and how the Presidency has grown far beyond its original bounds.

Our American Stories

January 26, 2017

Some Real Talk On Fake News

Jeffrey Rosen of the National Constitution Center talks about the challenge fake news presents to real journalists and Jeff Herbst, president and CEO of the Newseum, gives some advice on how not to fall for a made up story.

1A Show WAMU National Public Radio

January 02, 2017

The Power of the Executive Branch

Jeffrey Rosen discusses the power of U.S. presidents in the modern era and what Donald Trump can and cannot do as our next president.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

December 22, 2016

Donald Trump and the Overinflated Presidency

The president-elect will inherit an executive branch whose power has ballooned far beyond its constitutional bounds.

The Wall Street Journal

December 16, 2016

Bill of Rights at 225: Fourth Amendment all too relevant in digital age

At the National Constitution Center, we love all of the Bill of Rights amendments equally. But if I had to pick one amendment that gave rise to all the others, it would be the Fourth.

Philly.com

December 15, 2016

Jeffrey Rosen on the History of the Bill of Rights

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, was interviewed by telephone about the history of the Bill of Rights on the anniversary of its ratification.

C-SPAN Washington Journal

December 15, 2016

Republican Success Opens Door to Amending US Constitution

"The possibility of constitutional change is in the air," said law professor Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, a nonprofit museum that is hosting academic debates and symposiums about the efforts to amend the Constitution.

The New York Times

December 05, 2016

States’ Rights for the Left

IN the wake of the presidential election, as Democrats realized that Republicans will soon control all three branches of the federal government, progressives disinclined to secede from the Union rediscovered another exit strategy: states’ rights.

The New York Times

December 03, 2016

BEFORE DONALD TRUMP CALLED FOR FLAG-BURNING JAIL TIME, HILLARY CLINTON DID

“There’s a clear bipartisan consensus today that the First Amendment protects the right to burn the flag,” says Jeffrey Rosen, president and chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center. If the flag burning issue was brought again before the Supreme Court, he adds, “there is little doubt that the current court would reaffirm that ruling.”

Newsweek

November 29, 2016

Trump revives century-old debate over revoking citizenship

“It’s fair to say that the Supreme Court hasn’t visited this in a long time,” said Jeffrey Rosen, a law professor and the president and CEO of the National Constitution Center. (Rosen added that in the specific case of flag burning, he suspected that the current court under Chief Justice John Roberts would uphold it as a First Amendment right.)

Yahoo News

November 29, 2016

Trump unlikely to sway Supreme Court on flag burning

Most of the people on Trump's list of 21 potential high court nominees would agree with Scalia, says Jeffrey Rosen, president of the nonpartisan National Constitution Center. The flag-burning decisions, he says, are "entrenched as part of our First Amendment tradition."

USA Today

November 29, 2016

The Electoral College: How It Works And Why Some Want To Abolish It

For the second time in 16 years, a candidate has taken the presidency by winning the electoral vote, but not the popular vote. The Electoral College is enshrined in the U.S. Constitution. But critics have long said it’s an antiquated, even undemocratic system.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

November 21, 2016

Will President-Elect Trump Overturn Roe v. Wade?

Take one of the most controversial issues in the nation. Add the most controversial president-elect of the modern era. What do you get? It remains to be seen.

Yahoo News

November 18, 2016

A Look At What Trump Can And Cannot Do On His Signature Campaign Promises

The president of the United States has a lot of authority over the government. Selecting cabinet members, signing executive orders, nominating Supreme Court justices. But the president also faces constraints from Congress, the Constitution, the courts and existing laws. In the next hour, we look at some of president-elect Donald Trump’s signature campaign promises and explore what he can and cannot do.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

November 15, 2016

Call-In Special: Hopes and Fears for the Next Four Years

The Takeaway's John Hockenberry fields the accounts of individuals preparing for a Trump Administration, and asks what hopes or fears they are carrying into the next four years. Plus, what can the President-elect do--if anything--to assuage the concerns of Americans and live up to his campaign promise to 'make America great'?

The Takeaway with John Hockenberry National Public Radio

November 14, 2016

Election 2016 and the Electoral College

Election 2016 and the Electoral College Jeffrey Rosen talked about the history and role of the Electoral College, as well as the possibility of changing the electoral system.

C-SPAN

November 04, 2016

Expansion of Presidential Power

Sal and Jeffrey Rosen, head of the National Constitution Center, discuss how presidential power has expanded over time.

Khan Academy

November 02, 2016

The President as Commander-in-Chief

Sal and Jeffrey Rosen, head of the National Constitution Center, discuss the powers of the President in times of war using the Constitution Center's Interactive Constitution.

Khan Academy

November 02, 2016

Presidential Precedents of George Washington

Sal and National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen discuss how George Washington's presidency helped shape the office.

Khan Academy

November 02, 2016

Constitutional Powers of the President

Jeffrey Rosen, head of the National Constitution Center, gives an overview of Article II of the United States' Constitution (which covers the powers of the President).

Khan Academy

November 02, 2016

The Constitution Is For All of Us

National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen talks about a need for a commitment to nonpartisan constitutional education in our classrooms.

U.S. Department of Education

October 21, 2016

The Ongoing Vacancy At The Supreme Court And What It Means For High Profile Cases This Term

The Supreme Court begins a new term this week with still, only eight justices on the bench. Last March President Obama nominated Judge Merrick Garland to fill the vacancy following the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. But the Senate has, so far, declined to schedule a vote on Garland’s nomination. The justices have chosen to hear fewer cases this term, and, some say, seem to pushing off some of the more controversial issues. Yesterday the Court decided not to reconsider President Obama’s immigration ruling that would spare millions from deportation: Join us to talk about what’s ahead for the Supreme Court and how the stakes will change after the election.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

October 04, 2016

History of Presidential Debates and a Debate Moderator’s ‘Pivotal’ Task

NBC10's Jim Rosenfield speaks with President and CEO of the National Constitution Center Jeffrey Rosen about the history of presidential debates and how the "pivotal" task of the debate moderator has evolved.

NBC 10

September 27, 2016

Review of Jeffrey Rosen’s “Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet”

Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet by Jeffrey Rosen appears in the “Jewish Lives” series published by Yale University Press -- and such a series would not be complete if it omitted the first Jewish justice of the United States Supreme Court, the man who Franklin D. Roosevelt referred to as “Isaiah” and who might well be described as American Jewry’s secular saint -- but it is not a “life" of Brandeis.

History News Network

August 30, 2016

Brandeis: A great lawmaker who left his mark

Louis D. Brandeis was born and raised in Louisville, Ky., but the turning point in his life may have come in a German school. Because of the economic panic of 1873, his father, Adolph, saw his tobacco and textile business collapse, and he took the family back to Europe. (They had come to the United States 20 years earlier from Prague by way of Germany.)

philly.com

August 28, 2016

The Supreme Court’s Jeffersonian Jew

Today’s mania for consolidation likely would have offended the Jeffersonian sensibilities of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, who worked for years in opposition. Brandeis, born in 1856, “was the most-important critic of what he called “the curse of bigness” in government and business since Thomas Jefferson,” says Jeffrey Rosen in “Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet.”

The Jewish Chronicle

August 12, 2016

Jeffrey Rosen on Louis D. Brandeis and the Constitution on the campaign trail

“The Jewish Jefferson” – that’s what JEFFREY ROSEN, CEO of the National Constitution Center calls the late Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis. He’s written a book about his life and work called Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet. Sworn in 100 years ago, as a lawyer and judge, he was known for advancing socially progressive causes and has been namechecked by Justices Ginsberg, Breyer, and Kagan as being an inspiration for their time on the bench.

Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane WHYY NPR

August 11, 2016

27 words: Deconstructing the Second Amendment

It's only a sentence long; 27 words that barely take up a full line on the Bill of Rights. A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. And yet, for years, those 27 brief words have been the source of contentious debate -- seen by some as an inalienable protection against tyranny; by others as a dangerous anachronism. Here's a look at the Second Amendment, its phrases parsed and placed in legal and historical context. Our guides will be Constitutional experts Jeffrey Rosen and Jack Rakove.

CNN

August 11, 2016

Court in the Centre

Jeffrey Rosen explores how the US Supreme Court, once derided as the third branch of government, has become the busiest and most powerful institution in American politics, and how that makes the court’s current vacancy a particularly valuable prize in this presidential year.

BBC World Service

August 10, 2016

Brandeis’s Brain: On “Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet”

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO, on June 1, the Senate confirmed the nomination of Louis Brandeis to the Supreme Court. In many ways, the political climate then was similar to the one we find ourselves in now. Brandeis was appointed by a Democrat, Woodrow Wilson, in a presidential election year; the country was deeply divided over issues of economic inequality; and Republicans, worried about losing their grip on the Court, bitterly opposed the selection. The difference, of course, is that in 1916 the Senate actually held hearings on the nomination and ultimately gave Brandeis a vote.

Los Angeles Review of Books

August 08, 2016

The Jewish Jefferson

Brandeis was the greatest critic of bigness, in business and government, since his hero, Thomas Jefferson. In his time, he was an icon both for the libertarian Right and the civil libertarian Left. Today, however, some progressives who share Brandeis’s suspicion of big corporations lack a similar suspicion of big government. And some conservatives who mistrust mass NSA surveillance by the government are less concerned about the oligarchic influence wielded by big corporations.

Real Clear Books

August 08, 2016

Brandeis’s Fight Against the ‘Curse of Bigness’. The wisdom of the Jewish Jefferson.

People in the United States are experiencing a level of political discontent unseen in decades. Partisans on the right have long fought against the inexorable growth of big government, just as those on the left have always railed against the growing power of big business. This year, the sides have begun to overlap in a way that confuses pundits used to the standard right-left split on these issues. But for an example of a man who resisted the growth of big government and big business alike, we need look no further than the late Supreme Court justice, Louis Brandeis.

The Weekly Standard

August 06, 2016

Jeffrey Rosen on the National Constitution Center

Jeffrey Rosen talked about the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, the city of the 2016 Democratic National Convention (DNC). He also discussed how the center came into being, prior leaders of the organization, and constitutional issues.

C-SPAN Washington Journal

July 28, 2016

Wigs on Fire: What the Founders Would Have Thought of the 2016 Election

Since the beginning of the republic, Philadelphia has been America’s preeminent convening space for constitutional debate — the city to which all conversations about liberty inevitably refer. In a 2013 speech entitled “Boston to Philadelphia,” Senator Mike Lee of Utah noted that when the postal system was first created, it established throughout the Northeast thousands of stone markers engraved on the back with the legend “M to P,” standing for “Miles to Philadelphia.” The number on each stone — many of them still exist today — represented the distance between that marker and the city that hosted the drafting of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

Philadelphia Magazine

July 17, 2016

Deep Dive: Privacy and Security—What’s the Right Balance?

The mounting tension between privacy and security hit another inflection point when the FBI filed a suit against Apple earlier this year. Although the highest-profile case to date was dropped after the FBI was able to access the iPhone used by a San Bernardino shooter, the larger debate between technology firms and law enforcement authorities over data privacy and access remains. Moderator is Jeffrey Rosen, CEO of the National Constitution Center.

Aspen Ideas Festival

July 05, 2016

Analysis Of The Last Supreme Court Decisions Of The Term

It’s the last day of the Supreme Court’s current term. The biggest decisions are often announced in the final weeks. Last week the court handed down decisions on affirmative action and immigration. Today the court weighs in on what’s been called the most significant abortion rights case in a generation. The eight justices also issue opinions on the public corruption conviction of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and a case involving the Second Amendment. We discuss these cases and how the court has been affected by a vacancy on the bench since the death of Antonin Scalia last winter. Guests include Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO, The National Constitution Center; author of "Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet"

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

June 27, 2016

Supreme Court Decisions: Affirmative Action And Immigration

The Supreme Court votes 4-3 to uphold the affirmative action program at the University of Texas, and deadlocks on Obama’s immigration plan. Jeffrey Rosen of The National Constitution Center joins Susan Page to discuss the implications of the rulings.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

June 23, 2016

Review: In ‘Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet,’ Moral Vision and a True Believer’s Zeal

The brilliant, crusading Brandeis is the subject of Jeffrey Rosen’s excellent “Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet.” The book, part of the Yale Jewish Lives series, is not a full biography — that ground is already well trod — but rather a concise and sympathetic exploration of Brandeis’s main intellectual causes. It is well titled: Brandeis resembled an Old Testament prophet — Franklin D. Roosevelt called him “old Isaiah” — with his highly articulated moral vision and true believer’s zeal. It is also well timed: Mr. Rosen persuasively makes his case that recognizing Brandeis as an “American prophet” “seems more important today than ever.”

The New York Times

June 16, 2016

Linda Greenhouse And Jeffrey Rosen On The Supreme Court, Past And Present

It’s been nearly four months since the death of supreme court Justice Antonin Scalia left a vacancy on the bench. Republicans continue to stonewall President Obama’s nominee, saying there will be no hearing until after the election. Meanwhile, the Court has shied away from the kinds of blockbuster decisions that marked the last term.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

June 08, 2016

Why the Supreme Court Won’t Impact Gun Rights

This article is part of “Confirmations: The Battle Over the Constitution,” a partnership with the National Constitution Center. Guns are the new abortion. During the confirmation battles over Supreme Court nominees in the 1980s and 1990s, it sometimes seemed as if the only relevant question was how the prospective justice would vote on reproductive rights.

The Atlantic

June 07, 2016

Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet

There is enough in the long career of Brandeis to please and upset both modern progressives and conservatives. That probably wouldn’t have bothered Brandeis, who essentially took his inspiration and political philosophy from the beliefs of Thomas Jefferson.

Booklist Online

June 06, 2016

Newsworks Interviews Jeffrey Rosen

June 1 marks the 100th anniversary of Justice Louis Brandeis’ confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court. Cited as one of the court's most influential justices, his life and legacy are the focus of a new book, "Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet" by National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen.

Newsworks WHYY PBS

May 31, 2016

Commentary: Order on the court

Jeffrey Rosen commentary about the confirmation of Louis Brandeis to the Supreme Court - 125 days elapsed between his nomination and confirmation - the longest period any nominee has waited in American history. Merrick Garland will surpass this record in July.

philly.com

May 30, 2016

The Life And Times Of Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis

Four months after the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the SCOTUS remains ideologically deadlocked— dodging major decisions like the recent battle over mandatory birth control coverage, as the Senate refuses to budge on President Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland.

WGBH Boston Public Radio

May 24, 2016

Harvard Book Store hosts Jeff Rosen

According to Jeffrey Rosen, Louis D. Brandeis was “the Jewish Jefferson,” the greatest critic of what he called “the curse of bigness,” in business and government, since the author of the Declaration of Independence. Published to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of his Supreme Court confirmation on June 1, 1916, "Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet" argues that Brandeis was the most farseeing constitutional philosopher of the twentieth century.

Harvard Book Store

May 24, 2016

Citizen Brandeis

A fine new book, “Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet” by Jeffrey Rosen, describes how seriously the justice took these beliefs. Though eager to see big banks and businesses broken up to prevent monopolies, Brandeis turned on President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his young left-wing advisers when they used the New Deal to bring great swathes of the economy, including small farms, under central government control. Mr Rosen, who heads the National Constitution Centre in Philadelphia, describes Brandeis joining more conservative justices in striking down key planks of the New Deal in 1935.

The Economist

May 14, 2016

Interactive Constitution Looks at Americas’ rights from both political sides

A new website that allows users to explore, analyze and deconstruct the U.S. Constitution is something of an internet sensation. Jeff Rosen discusses this simple yet powerful idea.

USA TODAY

April 01, 2016

Book Review of Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet

In the latest installment of the publisher’s Jewish Lives series, a legal scholar examines the career of Louis D. Brandeis (1856-1941), “the most important American critic of what he called ‘the curse of bigness’ in government and business since Thomas Jefferson.” National Constitution Center president and CEO Rosen (The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America, 2007, etc.) states unambiguously that he is not attempting to offer a comprehensive biography, citing three high-quality, full-life biographies published after Brandeis left the Supreme Court in 1939. Rather, he presents “a condensed study of his thought and character."

Kirkus Review

April 01, 2016

New partnership between the National Constitution Center and The Atlantic

The National Constitution Center and The Atlantic are partnering in a new online content series, “Confirmations: The Battle over the Constitution.” National Constitution Center CEO, Jeffrey Rosen, explains how the partnership will work to make sure important constitutional questions remain a central part of the public debate over the Supreme Court vacancy.

Constitution Daily

March 28, 2016

C-SPAN, NCC Landmark Cases series re-airing for next two weeks

Landmark Cases explores the human stories and constitutional dramas behind some of the most significant and frequently cited decisions in the Supreme Court’s history. Produced in cooperation with the National Constitution Center, the 90-minute programs will air each night on C-SPAN at 10 p.m. ET, from Monday, March 28 to Saturday, April 2 and Monday, April 4 until Saturday, April 9, 2016.

Constitution Daily

March 28, 2016

What’s at Stake in Selecting Justice Scalia’s Replacement?

The fight over the open seat on the U.S. Supreme Court isn’t just a partisan struggle—it revolves around the very meaning of the Constitution. An article by Jeffrey Rosen.

The Atlantic

March 28, 2016

The Nomination of Merrick Garland Is a Victory for Judicial Restraint

National Constitution Center President Jeffrey Rosen profiles Supreme Court Nominee Judge Merrick Garland and argues that Merrick enforces rights enumerated in the Constitution while deferring to legislatures and elected officials when the Constitution doesn’t speak clearly.

The Atlantic

March 17, 2016

Jeffrey Rosen speaks at the Supreme Court on John Marshall

National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen spoke at the Supreme Court in a special event honoring “the Great Chief Justice,” John Marshall. The Supreme Court Historical Society and the John Marshall Foundation hosted Rosen’s lecture in connection with the 215th anniversary of Marshall’s appointment to the Bench by President John Adams.

Constitution Daily

March 17, 2016

Louis D. Brandeis American Prophet by Jeffrey Rosen

In the latest installment of the publisher’s Jewish Lives series, a legal scholar examines the career of Louis D. Brandeis (1856-1941), “the most important American critic of what he called ‘the curse of bigness’ in government and business since Thomas Jefferson.”National Constitution Center president and CEO Rosen (The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America, 2007, etc.) states unambiguously that he is not attempting to offer a comprehensive biography, citing three high-quality, full-life biographies published after Brandeis left the Supreme Court in 1939. Rather, he presents “a condensed study of his thought and character."

Kirkus

March 14, 2016

Jeffrey Rosen’s Supreme Court talk on John Marshall

National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen is introduced by Chief Justice John Roberts in a special March 19 lecture at the Supreme Court about John Marshall. Watch the video.

C-SPAN

March 09, 2016

What An Eight Member Supreme Court Could Mean For Key Cases Still To Be Decided This Year

No sooner than the news broke of the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia than Republicans in Congress made clear they’d reject any Obama nominee to replace him. This panel discussion includes Jeffrey Rosen, President and CEO of the National Constitution Center.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

February 25, 2016

Political Drama Over Scalia Successor Echoes 1968 Nomination Fight

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, about what happened when the Senate filibustered President Lyndon Johnson's Supreme Court nominations at the end of his term.

National Public Radio

February 16, 2016

What Made Antonin Scalia Great

Since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, liberals as well as conservatives have appropriately paid tribute to his legacy as one of the most influential justices of the twentieth century. Jeff Rosen examines Scalia's important impact over the years on how we think and talk about law.

The Atlantic

February 15, 2016

The Life And Legacy Of Justice Scalia — And The Future Makeup Of The Supreme Court

Justice Antonin Scalia was the leading conservative voice on the U.S. Supreme Court. His death over the weekend from natural causes ended a decades-long judicial career marked by lively opinions and adherence to a textural interpretation of the Constitution. Almost immediately after Scalia’s passing was announced, a political battle began. A panel discussion includes Jeff Rosen, CEO of the National Constitution Center.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

February 15, 2016

Justices to decide if Obama can stop deportation of 5M

Supreme Court observer Jeffrey Rosen discusses the court's decision to look at Obama's power under the Constitution.

The Salt Lake Tribune

February 02, 2016

The Supreme Court To Review President Obama’s Immigration Plan

Jeffrey Rosen is interviewed by Susan Page about President Obama's actions on immigration and the potential legal implications.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

January 20, 2016

SCOTUS Will Rule On Obama’s Immigration Actions Ahead of 2016 Election

Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains how this might impact the 2016 election. Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University and president of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, explains the potential legal implications surrounding this case.

The Takeaway with John Hockenberry National Public Radio

January 19, 2016

Debate Over The Second Amendment To The U.S. Constitution

The Second Amendment was added to the U.S. Constitution in 1781 as part of the Bill of Rights. Drafted by James Madison, the amendment went largely unnoticed for decades. Then in the 1970s and 80s, gun advocates began pointing to the Second Amendment as an absolute right, and justification for limiting firearms regulation. In 2008, the Supreme Court narrowly ruled that individuals have a right to gun ownership. The discussion features Jeff Rosen and other panelists.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

January 11, 2016

The Supreme Court Considers Affirmative Action As Campus Protests Over Racial Bias Continue

Jeffrey Rosen joins a guest panel to discuss the Supreme Court hearing arguments on admissions policies at the University of Texas which allow for racial preferences. A ruling against UT would have broad implications for affirmative action programs in institutions across the country even as racial unease has led to protests on dozens of campuses across the country.

The Diane Rehm Show WAMU National Public Radio

December 09, 2015

Landmark Cases: Historic Supreme Court Decisions

Jeffrey Rosen and Tomiko Brown-Nagin talk about the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education, in which the court unanimously ruled that separate public schools were not equal, reversing previous court decisions.

C-SPAN

November 23, 2015

America’s Unfinished Second Founding

A century and a half after the passage of the Reconstruction Amendments, public debate still revolves around the rights they guarantee. By Jeffrey Rosen and Tom Donnelly.

The Atlantic

October 19, 2015

Interactive Constitution illuminates bedrock of American liberty

“The Constitution, though the subject of vigorous debate, is the one document that binds us in these polarized times,” Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, said in an interview with Yahoo News. “It’s our birthright as Americans. The guarantees of liberty that it promises are really one thing that citizens of every different perspective can share and celebrate.” The American Constitution Society and The Federalist Society, two constitutional law organizations,helped select the experts to discuss matters of debate.

Yahoo News

September 19, 2015

Center launches interactivbe effort on the Constitution

The National Constitution Center launched an educational revolution Thursday - a new, digital way of teaching the founding document on the 228th anniversary of its signing in Philadelphia.

philly.com

September 17, 2015

Book Review of “Give Us The Ballot”

A review of Ari Berman's "Give Us the Ballot" by Jeffrey Rosen. The book explores the debate over the Voting Rights Act. Rosen writes that, "every time the Voting Rights Act came up for renewal, from 1969 to 2006, Republicans and Democrats in Congress and the White House repeatedly endorsed the broader interpretation. And the Supreme Court repeatedly responded by imposing the narrower interpretation by judicial fiat."

Sunday Book Review The New York Times

August 25, 2015

John Roberts, the Umpire in Chief

A Sunday Review opinion by Jeffrey Rosen about Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.'s bipartisan vision of judicial restraint.

The New York Times

June 28, 2015

Marriage Equality Becomes Law of the Land

NPR host John Hockenberry interviews Jeffrey Rosen, CEO of the National Constitution Center, on the Supreme Court's decision on Same-Sex Marriage.

The Take Away with John Hockenberry NPR (National Public Radio)

June 26, 2015

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